Apr 14

For example, according to Malia,[2] the event had no critical influence on the Croatian cultural milieu, but “successfully displayed trends in the formation of the Croatian literary language that emerged at the end of the century.” Malia argues that it was not until the 20th century, within the framework of “unitarian conceptions and linguistic policies”, that the meeting had a critical influence on the formation of a common Croatian and Serbian literary language. Despite all the efforts made on all sides, the establishment of different ethno-Guinean identities was problematic – for the three languages that followed, an almost identical dialect was chosen either as the only official dialect or as the second official dialect. This dialect is known by its linguistic name – the neo-Stokavian dialect – or by its geographical name – the southern dialect. This type of dialect extends from northwestern Montenegro to several parts of Croatia (Southern Dalmatia, Slavonia, Baranja and the Krajina region), most of Bosnia and Herzegovina and western Switzerland. The same dialect served as the basis for the common literary language of Serbs and Croats, taken up in 1850 by Serbian and Croatian intellectuals by the Viennese Literary Agreement. After the disintegration of Yugoslavia, this dialect became the basis of standard Croatian and Bosnian; The Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY) recognized it as one of the two “official” dialects of standard German. The first half of the 19th century proved to be a turning point in illyric designs. At that time, the Illyrians had individual debates with their opponents, and Zagreb, the centre of Croatian cultural and literary life, served as a fortress for their implementation and dissemination. Over the years, however, some of their supporters have recognized the impracticality of the linguistic and literary association of all Southern Slavs and have understood that the only real option would be the creation of a common literary language for Croats and Serbs, who share the Stokavian dialect and the Ijekwaian accent. [2] They decided not to mix existing dialects to create new ones, and that they, on the German and Italian model, they unanimously accepted that the “southern dialect” [The term “southern dialect” refers to the Montenegrin dialect of the region where Vuk Karad`i, and the language of the Serbs of Eastern Herzegovina.] are common for the literary dialect. , and they all decided to write “ije” [The text of the agreement itself lists many examples of how “ovihjeana,” “narodnijeh narje`ja,” “nijesu gradili novijeh,” “na onijem mjestima,” “ovijem,” kojijem, “po ostalijem danaĆ©njijem jezicima slavenskim,” etc.], where this dialect had a disyllabic yat reflex, and write “I,” “e” or “i,” where the reflex is monosyllabic.

Apr 14

Spener said Mexico was not the only country to withhold deliveries because of the drought. In other water contracts, such as the 1906 Convention, mexico and the United States have voluntarily accepted reduced deliveries to maintain and strengthen surveys on Lake Mead on the Colorado River during drought. There is a need for further cooperation and profound change. There is much to learn from the U.S.-Mexico collaboration to update the colorado River water distribution, known as 2017 Minute 323 and 2012 Water Contract 1912. It is a “Mexican water reserve” in Lake Mead, which allows Mexico to delay water distribution in the United States and store it in the United States, increasing the height of water on Lake Mead, a result that benefits U.S. and Mexican users and the environment. With the water level on Lake Mead, which serves as the basis for determining shortage conditions and cuts in distributions, Mexico is now participating in the reductions with Arizona, California and Nevada. The negotiated protocol also includes the recognition of the natural environment as a water user (a global breakthrough) and the provision of environmental flows to restore water basins in Mexico, with the United States funding the flow and restoration of the environment in exchange for water stored on Lake Mead. A water shortage emergency plan has also been put in place. In many ways, the protocol is a feature of creative binational and sub-national cooperation and a non-zero approach to dealing with common issues. Water deliveries and delays drive politics.

In 2013, hit by a severe drought, Texas farmers were furious at delays in the payment of Mexican water – similar to the anger of chihuahuas suffering from the current drought, unlike that international law was on the side of American farmers. Mexico then repaid water debts in 2016, but has since faced a large water deficit. But as torrential rains have brought a lot of water to Texas farmers this year, U.S. pressure on Mexico has never been more intense than during the 2013 drought (although Texas Gov. Greg Abbott and other politicians have tried to get the political hay out of the looming deadline). Nevertheless, there have been legal doubts that Mexico is not complying with its contractual obligations for the second consecutive five-year cycle. Sixth, it is essential to explicitly recognize the water needs of ecosystems and the hydrological services they provide to nature and humans. The contract for the colorado River and Tijuana Rivers and Rio Grande, signed on February 3, 1944, divided the waters of the Rio Grande from Fort Quitman to the Gulf of Mexico and the waters of the Colorado River between the two countries. From the waters of the Rio Grande, the treaty attributed to Mexico: the attempt to get American officials to lobby has been a struggle for the peasants of the valley for years.

Dale Murden, Citrus and President of the Texas Citrus Growers Association, spoke at length about the efforts of farmers when we went to orange trees on the outskirts of the mission. At the turn of the century, he said, he and other peasants in the valley went to Washington, D.C. with Texas officials, to convince the U.S. State Department to support their campaign to encourage Mexico to have more time for water. At a meeting, Susan Combs, then Texas Agriculture Commissioner, showed Foreign Ministry officials a satellite photo of a green oasis in the middle of Chihuahua.